Seiyū

(新日本のジョウト地方の小学校で)

先生:皆さん、おはようございます。今日は高金さんのお母さんが来て、仕事を紹介しそうです。挨拶してください!

学生達:高金さん、おはようございます!

高金:皆さんおはようございます。どうぞよろしくお願いします。

先生:高金さん、開始するには、職業を伝えませんか?

高金:うん。私は高金さとこと言います。SNN会社で声優として働いています。

学生達:(「ウァー」、「すごい」など)

高金:特に、ポケモン声優なんです。

先生:ポケモン声優?そうですか?

高金:(笑)うん、そうです。

女の学生:でもポケモンは独力で言えます!

高金:そう、そう。だけど、ポケモンの声が知っていますか?ヒトカゲとか?

学生達:「カゲ、カゲ!」(などの)

高金:はい、はい、そうです。本当らしいですね。それだけど、ヒトカゲの本の声じゃありません!じゃ、聞いてください?

(高金さんはビデオクリップを再生します。ヒトカゲの鳴き声が人間の声と全然同じではありません。)

男の学生:そちらはヒトカゲじゃない!

高金:実はこちらがヒトカゲの本の声です。

他の男の学生:うそつき!

先生:小谷くん!

男の学生:失礼します⋯

高金:説明しましょうか?(止)誰が「エスパー」の意味が知っていますか?

学生達:(「私!」、「知っています!」、「ケーシィのように」など)

高金:はい、そうです。じゃ、実は全部のポケモンがちょっとエスパーできます。それから人の声が聞こえて、それから名前が言語の言葉のように感じられます。けれども、コンピュータやカメラは脳がなくて、声が聞こえません。

学生達:(「ウァー」、「すごい」など)

高金:そして私の仕事はテレビのためにポケモンの声になるのです!

先生:高金さん、ありがとうございます。皆さん、質問ありますか? ⋯うん、林さん。

女の学生:ニューブリートンでどうしましょう?日本語で話さないのです。

高金:それはいい質問ですね。英語では、ヒトカゲの名前が「チャーマンダ」です。英語の「チャー」と「サラマンダ」で作った名前でしたっけ。もちろん、英語の声優もいます。

男の学生:「サラマンダ」何ですか?

先生:すみません、時間がなくなってきました。もう一度、高金さんのお母さんに感謝しましょう。

学生達:ありがとうございます!

高金:どういたしまして。皆さんよく勉強してね?さようなら。

学生達:さようなら!


(At an elementary school in Johto, Neo-Japan.)

Teacher: Good morning, everyone. Today Takagane’s mother has come to introduce her work. Say hello!

Students: Good morning, Ms. Takagane!

Takagane: Good morning, everyone. It’s very nice to meet you.

Teacher: Ms. Takagane, why don’t you tell us what you do to start?

Takagane: Yes. My name is Takagane Satoko. I work for SNN Co. as a voice actor.

Students: (“Wow”, “Cool”, etc.)

Takagane: In particular, I am a Pokémon voice actor.

Teacher: A Pokémon voice actor? Really?

Takagane: (laughs) Yes, I am.

Female student: But Pokémon can speak themselves!

Takagane: Yes, yes. But do you know Pokémon voices? Say, Hitokage? (Charmander)

Students: “Kage, kage!” (etc.)

Takagane: Yes, yes, that’s right. Very realistic! However, that’s not Hitokage’s real voice. Listen to this.

(Ms. Takagane plays a video clip. Charmander’s cry is not at all like a human voice.)

Male student: That’s not Hitokage!

Takagane: Actually, this is Hitokage’s real voice.

Another male student: Lies!

Teacher: Kotani!

Male student: Sorry…

Takagane: Let me explain. (pause) Who knows what “Psychic” means?

Students: (“Me!”, “I know!”, “Like Abra”, etc.)

Takagane: Yes, that’s right. Well, every Pokémon has a bit of Psychic ability. That’s why you can hear a person’s voice, and that’s why their names feel like words from language. However, computers and cameras and such don’t have brains, so they can’t hear the voices.

Students: (“Wow”, “Cool”, etc.)

Takagane: So my work is to be a Pokémon’s voice for TV.

Teacher: Ms. Takagane, thank you very much. Does anyone have questions? …Yes, Hayashi.

Female student: What about New Britain? They don’t speak Japanese.

Takagane: That’s a good question. In English, Hitokage’s name is “Charmander”. As I recall, it’s a name made from the English words “char” and “salamander”. Of course, there are English voice actors as well.

Male student: What’s “salamander”?

Teacher: I’m sorry, we’ve run out of time. Once again, let’s thank Takagane’s mother.

Students: Thank you very much!

Takagane: You’re welcome. Everyone study hard, okay? Goodbye.

Students: Goodbye!


Several years ago NaCreSoMo participant Gashley wrote a bit of Pokémon fanfiction, slightly “alternate universe” and slightly “gritty reboot”. Among other positive traits, it had some very strong world-building, enough so that I told her “I want to write fanfiction on your fanfiction.” Today that’s finally come true: I took one particular nice idea (her in-universe explanation for why Pokémon say their own names) and ran with the societal implications of that.

(Again, that’s her explanation, not mine. All credit to Gashley!)

This piece was also interesting because I wrote it in Japanese first. I haven’t done extended writing in Japanese in a while, but it actually wasn’t that bad. (It helped that I (a) was writing a scene with elementary schoolers in it, and (b) had both the OS X Japanese-English dictionary and Google Translate on hand.) Anyway, if you can read Japanese, it’s probably better than the English one, because I didn’t bother doing an idiomatic translation of everything. (Some things were just completely left out.)

Part of NaCreSoMo.

blog comments powered by Disqus